From my other Tumblr:

rdmond:

Hybrid by Marcin Wichary, on Flickr

(Photo by Marcin Wichary)

For a while now I’ve been working on an API for the Guggenheim Collection Online — don’t get too excited, it’ll be a long time before we start handing out API keys — and I thought it would be a good time to share a few of the things I’ve learned, especially…

When I first came across the Metal Museum while working on Museums in Social Media I was intrigued just because it sounds cool and because I like museums named after the thing they’re about, like metal, mustard, or hammers (yes, there are two Hammer Museums — and I think I’d rather go to the one in Alaska over the one in Los Angeles).

These “Repair Days” events look great. You can watch some artisans at work and leave with busted pot or wrought iron chair all fixed up. It brings people together around a real activity and I bet every time you sit in that chair, you’ll remember the person who fixed it.

Isn’t that the kind of experience we’re all aiming to give our visitors?

", I think that the generation ahead of you always tends to set you puzzles—and the thing that always puzzled me about the post–World War II generation is: Why did they go from being optimistic about science and rationality, and things like planning, to a dark, almost apocalyptic pessimism in the 1970s? It’s an incredibly quick switch, and the example I just gave you about the correct liberal way of doing a film about torture is a good one. You go out and elegantly film people, sometimes in silhouette, recounting terrible, horrible experiences—combined with haunting, Arvo Pärt–style music over bleak landscapes. And that’s it. I’m not being cynical or flippant about the peoples’ experiences—but I just think that the editorial approach was to wrap those experiences in a rigid melancholy that traps everyone—audience, filmmakers, and the tortured—in a feeling of helplessness. And it’s called moving. So I decided to do a series that went back and looked at the rise and fall of that optimism about science and rationality and planning to try and understand more why it failed."

In Conversation with Adam Curtis, Part II | e-flux (via jomc)

(via jomc)

artistsstudios:

Louise Bourgeois’ Studio 
ytginnyc:

sfmoma:

Tomorrow is Jackson Pollock’s birthday. Y’all ready?
publicartfund:

Happy Almost Birthday, Jackson Pollock. 


Shoes with lots of history (Jackson Pollock’s)

ytginnyc:

sfmoma:

Tomorrow is Jackson Pollock’s birthday. Y’all ready?

publicartfund:

Happy Almost Birthday, Jackson Pollock. 

Shoes with lots of history (Jackson Pollock’s)

"Projects that are open to participation—where the audience is invited to comment on and collaborate in the making of the work using a technological system set up by the curator, institution, or artist—do question authorship. But authorship, it turns out, is not the biggest problem in our age of user-generated content. Who made it becomes of secondary importance to who uploaded it, who tagged it, and who now owns it."

Beryl Graham and Sarah Cook in Rethinking Curating: Art After New Media (2010)

(Source: pcah.us, via jeffdtaylor)

My essay on museums and social media for the French Ministry of Culture’s blog.

(via Fast Company)

Looking at this video and then back to The Best Connected Artwork at the Walters”, I can’t but think that if you can do this in real time, on the giant video floor with data streaming from Facebook, you can certainly come up with an engrossing visualization of all the interesting connections within a collection. Or better yet, a real time visualization of people using (searching, viewing online, linking) and interacting with (tweeting, blogging, pushing buttons) the collection. Something like IMA’s dashboard, but sexier and more focused

This was something I really found lacking in Talk to me. It would be interesting for that exhibition to do more talking back.

I want to see this done with art, as art.

(Source: fastcodesign.com)

Over on my other blog, a little more design wisdom from Steve Jobs…

(Source: blog.litot.es)